Common Insurance Questions

Each insurance policy is different. Most companies are open about what is covered by their policies and this information can be found on their website. Otherwise, you can always contact customer service for that particular company to ask them about what is or is not covered.

A pre-existing condition is a condition or medical diagnosis that was made before an insurance policy has gone into effect. For example, a pet diagnosed with skin allergies before signing up for pet insurance will not be covered by any medical issues related to their skin allergies. They will, however, be covered for a medical condition that occurs after signing up for pet insurance.

Absolutely not! Pets experience accidents and illnesses just like people and you never know when it will happen. It’s actually better to insure your pet when they are young and healthy so you don’t have to worry about waiting periods or pre-existing conditions.

This doesn’t necessarily mean your older pet with chronic ear infections or other common disease won’t benefit from pet insurance! Any additional or future issues would be covered and help you tremendously with veterinary bills long term. Then, when something else happens (and it will, trust us!), you won’t have to worry about paying for it all on your own.

The policy you choose for your pet depends entirely on what you want covered, what you need covered, and/or what you are able to afford.​ Generally speaking, the two questions you should ask yourself when considering pet insurance are…

  • What can I afford to spend on my pet’s medical care? If my pet needs $1500 emergency surgery or a $3000 MRI, am I able to pay that bill, up front, by myself? If the answer is YES, then maybe pet insurance isn’t necessary for you. If the answer is NO, then it is definitely worth considering pet insurance to help you cover those unexpected costs whenever they should arise.
  • What am I willing to spend for my pet’s medical care? This is a dificult question to answer and one that is unique to pet insurance. When it comes to our own health insurance, we will generally go to great lengths to save our own life. For our pets, however, it may not always be sensible to spend several thousand dollars for their medical care. Every pet is different, every relationship is different, and every financial situation is different. If you are willing to spend however much it takes to save your pet’s life but know you can’t afford it, then we strongly recommending talking with an insurance company so they can help you choose the best plan for you. Many companies have various tiers of coverage so you can choose what’s best for your budget and still get your ideal amount of coverage for your pet.

A premium is the amount of money you are required to pay for an insurance policy, typically divided into monthly payments. For example, if your pet’s insurance policy is $500/year, you would pay close to $42/mo. The cost of insurance premiums are specific to your pet based on things like age, breed, and if they are spayed or neutered.

A deductible is the amount of money you pay out of pocket before the insurance company will start covering expenses. The cost of an insurance deductible can change depending on the policy chosen. For example, if you prefer to pay a lower deductible at the time of illness or injury, your monthly payments will be higher. On the other hand, if you would like to keep your monthly costs to a minimum, you will be expected to pay a larger deductible at the time of illness or injury.​

In veterinary medicine, almost all insurance companies require payment to the veterinarian at the time of service. They will then reimburse the owner after they submit a claim. Some insurance companies like Trupanion, however, can pay your animal hospital directly so you avoid paying a big bill and having to wait for reimbursement from the insurance company.​

The three main types of insurance are for accidents, illness, and wellness/prevention. Accident insurance will pay for expenses related to unforseen circumstances such as a dog attack, hit by a car, intestinal blockage, or a torn toenail. Waiting periods for coverage may apply and will likely have some exclusions (i.e. exam fees, cesarean section, etc). Illness insurance covers certain illnesses such as pancreatitis, diabetes, or kidney disease. If your pet has any *pre-existing conditions, those conditions will not be covered by insurance. Wellness insurance provides coverage for routine wellness expenses such as annual exams, vaccines and/or flea and tick treatments. It’s important to note that not all plans cover every accident and illness, and not all companies offer each type of coverage.

Common Insurance Questions

Each insurance policy is different. Most companies are open about what is covered by their policies and this information can be found on their website. Otherwise, you can always contact customer service for that particular company to ask them about what is or is not covered.

A pre-existing condition is a condition or medical diagnosis that was made before an insurance policy has gone into effect. For example, a pet diagnosed with skin allergies before signing up for pet insurance will not be covered by any medical issues related to their skin allergies. They will, however, be covered for a medical condition that occurs after signing up for pet insurance.

Absolutely not! Pets experience accidents and illnesses just like people and you never know when it will happen. It’s actually better to insure your pet when they are young and healthy so you don’t have to worry about waiting periods or pre-existing conditions.

This doesn’t necessarily mean your older pet with chronic ear infections or other common disease won’t benefit from pet insurance! Any additional or future issues would be covered and help you tremendously with veterinary bills long term. Then, when something else happens (and it will, trust us!), you won’t have to worry about paying for it all on your own.

The policy you choose for your pet depends entirely on what you want covered, what you need covered, and/or what you are able to afford.​ Generally speaking, the two questions you should ask yourself when considering pet insurance are…

  • What can I afford to spend on my pet’s medical care? If my pet needs $1500 emergency surgery or a $3000 MRI, am I able to pay that bill, up front, by myself? If the answer is YES, then maybe pet insurance isn’t necessary for you. If the answer is NO, then it is definitely worth considering pet insurance to help you cover those unexpected costs whenever they should arise.
  • What am I willing to spend for my pet’s medical care? This is a dificult question to answer and one that is unique to pet insurance. When it comes to our own health insurance, we will generally go to great lengths to save our own life. For our pets, however, it may not always be sensible to spend several thousand dollars for their medical care. Every pet is different, every relationship is different, and every financial situation is different. If you are willing to spend however much it takes to save your pet’s life but know you can’t afford it, then we strongly recommending talking with an insurance company so they can help you choose the best plan for you. Many companies have various tiers of coverage so you can choose what’s best for your budget and still get your ideal amount of coverage for your pet.

A premium is the amount of money you are required to pay for an insurance policy, typically divided into monthly payments. For example, if your pet’s insurance policy is $500/year, you would pay close to $42/mo. The cost of insurance premiums are specific to your pet based on things like age, breed, and if they are spayed or neutered.

A deductible is the amount of money you pay out of pocket before the insurance company will start covering expenses. The cost of an insurance deductible can change depending on the policy chosen. For example, if you prefer to pay a lower deductible at the time of illness or injury, your monthly payments will be higher. On the other hand, if you would like to keep your monthly costs to a minimum, you will be expected to pay a larger deductible at the time of illness or injury.​

In veterinary medicine, almost all insurance companies require payment to the veterinarian at the time of service. They will then reimburse the owner after they submit a claim. Some insurance companies like Trupanion, however, can pay your animal hospital directly so you avoid paying a big bill and having to wait for reimbursement from the insurance company.​

The three main types of insurance are for accidents, illness, and wellness/prevention. Accident insurance will pay for expenses related to unforseen circumstances such as a dog attack, hit by a car, intestinal blockage, or a torn toenail. Waiting periods for coverage may apply and will likely have some exclusions (i.e. exam fees, cesarean section, etc). Illness insurance covers certain illnesses such as pancreatitis, diabetes, or kidney disease. If your pet has any *pre-existing conditions, those conditions will not be covered by insurance. Wellness insurance provides coverage for routine wellness expenses such as annual exams, vaccines and/or flea and tick treatments. It’s important to note that not all plans cover every accident and illness, and not all companies offer each type of coverage.